Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
a temporary city in the desert. it has all the -- it is everything any normal city would provide. it last trade days. -- lasts for eight days. it is kind of radical but radical in both senses of that term. radical conventionally means pushing boundaries, going beyond normal categories. the thing about how it is used, it is deeply rooted in the human soul. things that go deep. and did not change that are fixed. we created a kind of city that goes to those extremes at the same time. it broadens your view. and we have this roiling improvisation taking place. on government interactions. all that -- of it unplanned. at the center you have a man and the city is without like a big temple complex. and you can find those things at the same time, this radical coherence and freedom. it can begin to do something, then new creative -- you great meeting -- create meaning that is substantial. >> one of the most beautiful things, we were talking about are backstage. the idea of cultural capital, considering we're in a context of the economics of culture. one of the most beautiful things about the festiva
biased, but the greatest city. we are in greenwich village. we have a world-class faculty. i believe there is a value proposition that is different than other institutions. we are a fabulous place, but we are not the only fabulous place. our message to students from prospect on is about what are you looking for in an institution, what are you looking for in a program? and remember, about half the freshmen who begin this fall will change their major at least once. what are you looking for in a program? small, large, internship opportunities, faculty? one thing to consider should be the financial investment, not just the first year, but across four or five years. families will cobble together a package, a financial package, that will get through the first year, and then they find themselves in real difficulty. our goal is not to scare people away, and not to be the latest. we are working hard to get the limited amount of financial aid we have to the right students. we're completely need based. i could count on one hand the number of merit scholarships that are not need based. we are te
levels. we have thousands of positions for city council, for school boards, for municipal government that go unfilled every year because people don't run for them. and you can start anywhere. so i would say to all the women in the audience, to all of your children, to all of your girls cannot tell them to run because that is how we will get a woman president pierre >> that is a great point pierre >> i had 24 hours to make my decision about running the first time for state senate. i would not have run. i called my husband and said they asked me care at the kids and the law practice and you have your job. and my husband said you are really did this and we will make it work. you can make it work. >> the corollary about the minivan and the phone, my boys, when there were little, they used to say, mom, you are always on the phone. i told them that i get paid by the word. [laughter] >> i would not have run for senate if it were not for my husband. i quit my role as attorney general entered a year-and-a- half off of work. we went from one income -- we went from two incomes to one income. th
at the same time he looked at a new york city janitor who might be working in that building. their average income $33,000 for the same year but with a tax rate of 24.9%. so the janitor who might work in that building is paying a tax rate ten points higher than the people who live in the building who have an average income of over $1.1 million. anybodyknow how justifies that as a fair sharing of the burden in this country. and warren buffet has been very clear as one of the wealthiest people in the world, certainly one of the wealthiest people in this country that he find it's prosperous that he pace a tax rate a 23r5x of the tax rate -- that he pays a tax rate that is a fraction of the tax rate paid by his executive assistant. so i would hope that in any final agreement that unearned income would be taxed on a basis more coatly equivalent to what earned income payers pay. now on the spending side of the equation we've had a lack of perspective. you've seen speakers calling for 600 billion in healthcare savings over the next ten years. the president said a lower number f. -- lower number. i
about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another. i think the word compromise is over used, underutilized and misunderstood by an awful lot of people. it does not mean throwing in the towel. i have a couple of friends that i've talked to about compromises. in one instance, their idea of a compromise is when i see if there is a way. -- when i see it their way
resources to needs across new york city and long island. cody palusso and deanna robinson helped make sure that new york's northern suburbs were not forgotten. and touring the damaged communities was a heart-wrenching task. lane bodian who travels with me was with me every step of the way. and the logistic team, megan murphy, janet jones and alex victor helped make sure we got where we needed to be in those very difficult days after the storm and ever since. additionally, mr. president, two members of my team were hit hard by the storm. they lost their houses or their houses were badly flooded, and i want to thank them because they ignored their personal situation, particularly in the days after the storm, to help new yorkers. for that, i will always be grateful to kyle strober who runs our long island office and to michelle basek, his assistant whose family's home was flooded badly on staten island. and finally, the leader of our team is a guy named mike lynch who has molded us into a great operation, and he didn't put his name in here characteristically, but he deserves a huge amount of
inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" magazine. he recognized the city was changing and there was this new middle-class audience that did not have their own publication. he created the magazine. it was different from anything we have seen before. it was so different it sort of took your breath away. it was deeply impressive to me. he got wonderful writers. he was all for subjective takes on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and
cities in north carolina and. his efforts generated thousands of volunteers and helped win the state for the democrats for the first time since 1976. the last year has been a busy for them on the campaign trail, over 50 radio and television interviews and 40 events, from concerts' and field offices to opening the final night of the democratic national convention. just yesterday, he helped brighten up washington, d.c. by performing at the lighting of the national christmas tree. his music was with us as we celebrated the season, our family and country. i would like to welcome james taylor. [applause] [applause] >> thank you, bill, thank you, susan, for the cupcakes. i got a fire one myself. mighty tasty. you know, i titled this thing today election reform because i thought i needed to have a title. i probably know less about election reform then pretty much everybody in the room. i will talk a little bit about it toward the end. really, what i wanted to do it is described a pilgrim's progress through the political process as a surrogate. i will start actually as i used to start and ha
that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? stockridge to chelsea. >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to austin, texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to solve the fiscal cliff, i'm sure he'd like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song, i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. [ap
today. should washington compromise or go over the cliff? joining us from bay city, michigan, democratic line. caller: i am calling in in reference to this. i think that we paid today. into social security for 40 years. they should not touch that. they should leave medicare alone. i would like to have a list of all the people that want these pork barrel things in. the names and states of the people who want this. we voted them in and they should be working for the people and not the party. >> where is your frustration level with regards to congress and the president? caller: the president should get off of his high horse and just renew the tax cuts and go on and cut these pork barrel things. one guy wants this from this state, one guy wants that from that state, i am tired of hearing this. >> we have gathered all of the information on our website. on our homepage we will continue to monitor what happens in the house and senate as lawmakers continued to move closer to the tax issue, something we talked about this morning on "washington journal." host: maya macguineas is heading up the fix
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by th
journal with charts showing various cities around the u.s. and how well they have done in the last year or so. overall, still down. phoenix, up 21% this year. but home prices are still down 46% from the 2008-09 low end. detroit up 10%, but still off 327% from there. -- from their peak. and this article appeared in yesterday's wall street journal -- what is the realtor association's view on the national governments refinance programs they have offered and how do you see expansion of that program? guest: it has worked. this program specifically addressed responsible homeowners. these are homeowners who happen to be under water, yet they have been making their mortgage payments. they may be stuck at 6% or 7% interest rate. the prevailing market interest rate is about 3.5% or 4%. government stepping in to say you have been responsible even in this difficult economic circumstances, if you have to pay your mortgage on time and not defaulted, so let's get you into the current market rate. from the private lenders perspective, they are saying under water, forget it, we will not refinance. for g
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14